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Wexler Gallery

Studio K.O.S.

  • Edie McDonald, Walker Art Center Teen Arts Council
    The prominence of pointy sharp imagery in the text jumps out like an ambush. The text a dagger which sears and seeps into the imagination of the brutality of a white supremacist culture that is always on the attack.
  • Joyce Strand, Walker Art Center Teen Arts Council
    Red for pain.
  • Rick Savinon, K.O.S. Member
    Blues.
  • Robert Branch, K.O.S. Member
  • Saniyah, University Community Collaborative
    At first I thought about the statement ‘Am I Black enough?’ and I think that's something every black person has to think about and go through also. We think ‘Am I black enough?’ and the idea is fading and we slowly start to believe we’re not.
  • Wendy Tronrud, Walker Art Center Teen Arts Council
    I now can see the darkness of lightness.
  • Wendy Wang, University Community Collaborative
    My image is supposed to represent the repetition of history. All the different fragments are supposed to represent the different identities that we learn from, the voices of history. They’re all fragmented and not just one person, and I think there’s a lot of pain and hurt that goes behind their stories.
  • Zahieem Armstead, University Community Collaborative
    There is no light without shadow nor is there shadow without light.
  • Zahieem Armstead, University Community Collaborative
    Good without evil is common, evil without good is ordinary.
  • Alexandra Nicome, Walker Art Center Teen Arts Council
    Thinking about light, transparency, and mirror or reflection. Making the ‘I Am’ near perceptible/imperceptible in a radiant lightness.
  • Amirah Ellison, Walker Art Center Teen Arts Council
    nspired by the idea that invisibility is sometimes considered a superpower --- ‘I can see you, but you can’t see me’ reminds me also of Du Bois’s concept of the double consciousness.
  • Amirah Ellison, Walker Art Center Teen Arts Council
    In the beginning...there was blackness.

>> EXPLORE WORKS BY TIM ROLLINS AND K.O.S.

>> READ THE NEW YORK TIMES ARTICLE.

 

Studio K.O.S. is a collective of artists who are continuing the legacy of Tim Rollins and the Kids of Survival (K.O.S.), whose collaborative approach to making art began in the Bronx in the 1980s. What was manifested from their collaborations became a powerful body of work that can be seen today in over 120 museums and public collections worldwide including MoMA, The Tate Modern, and The Art Institute of Chicago. Studio K.O.S. currently consists of Angel Abreu, Jorge Abreu, Robert Branch, and Nelson Ricardo Savinon, original members who have remained active for over 30 years. They remain dedicated to the mission of empowering young people through exposure to art and literature.

Invisible Man (after Ralph Ellison), 2020, is a video artwork made up of digital files made by participants of Collaborative Workshops for Transcendence through Art and Knowledge led by Studio K.O.S during the summer and fall of 2020. Participants were tasked with creating a personal interpretation of Ellison’s Invisible Man using digital tools and a framework established by Studio K.O.S. In the context of an educational workshop, each individual shares their reasoning behind their choices, and participates in a discussion about how the novel relates to contemporary society.

The ongoing video project is a visual exploration of themes found within Ralph Ellison’s 1952 magnum opus, Invisible Man. Participants are tasked with creating a personal interpretation of the text using digital tools and a framework established by Studio K.O.S. In the context of an educational workshop, each individual shares their reasoning behind their choices and participates in a discussion about how the novel relates to contemporary society.

 

Artist CV and Other Documents

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