Wexler Gallery

Mami Kato

  • Samara, 2014
    Fabric, epoxy resin, cashew resin, magnet
    32 x 9.5 x 35 in
  • Samara, 2014
    Fabric, epoxy resin, cashew resin, magnet
    32 x 9.5 x 35 in
  • Big Knot, 2019
    Rice stalks, cotton, linen, insulation foam, epoxy resin, wood
    89 x 32 x 50 in
  • Big Knot, 2019
    Rice stalks, cotton, linen, insulation foam, epoxy resin, wood
    89 x 32 x 50 in
  • Closed Beginning Opens The End
    Egg shells, rice paper, milk paint, pigment, mirror
    24 x 10.5 x 24 in
  • Closed Beginning Opens The End
    Egg shells, rice paper, milk paint, pigment, mirror
    24 x 10.5 x 24 in
  • Umbilical Field, 2011
    Rice stalks, cotton, wood, insulation foam, epoxy resin
    21 x 54 x 51 in
  • Umbilical Field, 2011
    Rice stalks, cotton, wood, insulation foam, epoxy resin
    21 x 54 x 51 in
  • Bear Follicles, 2016
    Cotton, epoxy resin, milk paint, pigment, wood
    34 x 17 x 33 in
  • Bear Follicles, 2016
    Cotton, epoxy resin, milk paint, pigment, wood
    34 x 17 x 33 in
  • Bear Follicles, 2016
    Cotton, epoxy resin, milk paint, pigment, wood
    34 x 17 x 33 in
  • Rice Bowls, 2010
    Rice stalks, jute ropes, cashew resin, epoxy resin
    24 x 14.25 x 19.25 in
  • Rice Bowls, 2010
    Rice stalks, jute ropes, cashew resin, epoxy resin
    24 x 14.25 x 19.25 in

Kato’s  begins with an abstract concept or notion and uses her sculpture to give form to this visual poetry. She approaches art-making with an intention to visualize the invisible order/dynamism of nature and the universe. The material she chooses is often a tool of metaphor used to support the conceptual goal of a sculpture. Kato’s rice straw sculptures not only reference her Japanese heritage, but represent for her the potential of energy to surge from the earth, as well as its ability to sustain life, and her pieces made of eggshells elicit a visceral response from the viewer before their intellect begins to process the experience. Other examples of her work, which combine animal head & plant-like forms, are her examinations of the order throughout nature, yet showing a side of its experimental and exploration quest.